Hanging Tomato Planter Setup

Hanging tomato planters will make growing tomatoes on your deck, balcony, or patio a cinch. They offer many advantages over conventional planters. Tomato plants can grow very large and require a lot of support to keep the vine from failing under its own weight. Hanging tomato planters eliminate that problem. Plants in conventional planters are also prone to getting damaged by getting knocked over by accidental bumps, gusts of wind, and boisterous pets or kids. A hanging tomato planter will put your plants out of harm’s way.


I designed the Garden365 Hanging Garden specifically for growing tomatoes upside down. There are many hanging tomato planter choices on the market but none offer the same blend of function, versatility, and style. I tested them all. My patented design offers the ability to grow plants on top and bottom, a large water and soil volume, and a very versatile hanging bracket. You can hang it on just about any wall, railing, or fence (including chain link).


Garden365 Hanging Tomato Planter Installation

Planting Tomatoes Upside Down

Planting and growing tomatoes in the Garden365 hanging tomato planter is easy. Start by removing the drainage platform from the planter. Fold back the triangular plant clamps. If your plants are large, plant clamps can be cut off altogether. Place the drainage platform back in the planter.


Garden365 Hanging Tomato Planter Drainage Platform Garden365 Hanging Tomato Planter Drainage Platform Details Garden365 Hanging Tomato Planter View From Above

Remove your tomato plant from the blister pack and break apart its roots. Roots should be free to grow in all directions as shown below.


Tomato Plant Root Preparation

Push the roots through the planter and the drainage platform. This step may take a bit of patience with larger plants, depending on the size of the root bulb.


Inserting Tomato Plant into Garden365 Hanging Tomato Planter

Once the root bulb is inside the hanging tomato planter, fill it with a quality potting mix. Soil-less potting mixtures offer many advantages over conventional soils, especially when it comes to growing tomatoes in pots.


Roots of Tomato Plant Inside Garden365 Hanging Tomato Planter

Hang your planted hanging tomato planter on the fence or wall. At this point you can plant other plants in the top. Tomato plants are demanding and are best paired with less demanding herbs. Some good companions include chives, basil, or oregano.


Hanging Garden365 Hanging Tomato Planter On Fence

Hanging Tomato Planter Examples

A hanging tomato planter is a great option for any urban gardener or gardenista. Tomatoes are not the only plants that can be grown upside down. There are many other choices worth experimenting with. Here are several images kindly shared with me by some of the early users of the Garden365 Hanging Garden along with some of my own.


Garden365 Hanging Tomato Planter Example Garden365 Hanging Tomato Planter Example Garden365 Hanging Tomato Planter Example Garden365 Hanging Tomato Planter Example

Thank you for taking the time to view my post. Please use comment section below to post photos or share your experiences with hanging tomato planters. I’d love to hear all about it. Let’s grow happily ever after.


Tom Korzen
Founder
Tom is an avid urban gardener, an accomplished industrial designer, and the creator of the Garden365 line of premium container gardening products. He loves finding innovative new ways of making the most of his tiny little patio garden. Tom has also recently published the Garden365 Container Gardening Guide.
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  • Uttara

    Love this product. Thinking of buying it. What else can I plant instead of tomatoes? I have heard that beans can also be planted upside down. I that so?
    Thanks 🙂

    • Thanks Uttara! We love it too;-) Peppers, basil, cucumbers, eggplants, and beans can also be grown upside down as long as you start with a decent size plant. I’d also recommend planting herbs or small flowers on the top to keep the soil from drying out too quickly. Hope this helps!

  • Scott

    Thanks for the post. Do certain varieties of indeterminates do better than others?

    • Hi Scott,

      I typically stick to determinate varieties of tomatoes in container gardens because I can’t always tend to my plants as much as required and they’re more forgiving. As far as indeterminates go, I’d recommend Husky Red, Husky Gold and Husky Pink hybrids for containers. These smaller varieties should do well. Hope this helps. Please let me know how it works out.